Friday, June 14, 2013

Interview with UK Fantasy Author of Postponing Armageddon, Adele Abbot

adeleWhat is your name, where were you born and where do you live now?

Adele Abbot (one T), I was born in York, UK & I live between Leeds and Bradford, UK
Please tell us a little about yourself (something different not contained in your bio).
I’m the daughter of an Indie writer and honorary niece to another
How long have you been writing?
Since 2006
What do you believe is the most difficult thing about becoming an author?
Finding readers! That’s a little mischievous, obviously, putting one word after another to make an interesting and coherent read is probably the most difficult – especially when you have a 4 year old needing your attention. But once you've served your apprenticeship, and I think I have, getting your name out there is difficult and frustrating, I do have a few novels that have fallen by the wayside.
What do you like to do when you are not writing?
Getting out and about, what my son calls ‘Mummy & Daddy’ days.
What is the name of your latest book, and if you had to summarize it in less than 20 510x765-Armageddon-250x375words what would you say?
It’s called Postponing Armageddon. A historical fantasy, dogmatic religion versus creatures we think of as myth and legend about to be made extinct.
Was there any particular thing that inspired you to write Postponing Armageddon?
It was written after I was made redundant as we say here – what you call being let go in the US. It was something to fill my time between looking for jobs. The original idea came from an ages old short story which happened to come to mind.
Is this book part of a series?
I would like it to be. Ideas for volume two are settling down. I guess it depends on how well volume one does.
Would you share a blurb with us?
When history goes off course, can it be nudged back? The second coming of Jesus Christ was supposed to take place in the thousandth year of His era, but it did not happen as scheduled.
Would you share a short excerpt?
Almost on the horizon, a waterspout was visible; a long writhing tail of dark air descending from a bulbous blue-black cloud.
“The Summer Hawk,” I heard someone say – that was the Viking ship which had sailed a little while before us. The men looking over the stern rail had a better view than those of us in the waist and I went back up the steep slope of the after deck which, at the stern, was quite high above the sea level.
Looking back, it was now possible to see great waves breaking about the lean shape of the Summer Hawk. As I watched, lightning scratched a jagged line from the cloud to the single mast, rigging and sparks flew skyward, snatched by that writhing funnel of air. The stern seemed to rise up and twist, the bows disappeared behind curtains of green and black water; the ship slid beneath the waves and was gone in a space of heartbeats. Gone, leaving only a wake to show she had ever been there.
Do you have plans for a new book? Would you tell us a little about it?
I mentioned that I would like to make this a series. A second volume might be placed in Northern Italy, early in the 12th century. The then Pope was a nasty piece of work and there was an attempt by the French to have him arrested and tried before a court of law which failed. I have a feeling that my characters might take a hand…
How long have you been writing? And who or what inspired you to write?
I guess I have to blame my Dad and my Uncle for inspiration. I've been writing since 2006 when I put Postponing Armageddon on paper but I wrote another fantasy between that and getting Postponing Armageddon published. Called Of Machines and Magics, it was actually written second and published first - both are published by Barking Rain Press.
Do you gift books to readers to do reviews?
I do. I’m very grateful for a thoughtful review; they’re worth a lot to me.
How do you come up with the Title and Cover Designs for your book/books? Who designed the Cover of your books?
With Postponing Armageddon it was a lot of discussion with Dad & my Uncle and since it reached the shortlist of the Sir Terry Pratchett/Transworld 2011 competition, that’s set in stone. Of Machines and Magics came out of equally long email discussion with Sheri Gormley, our President & Executive Director. The cover in both cases was created by Michael Leadingham who got the flavor so absolutely right.
Have you ever based characters on people you know or based events on things that have happened to you?
I've pinched names from people I know for my characters – with permission – but if I've based actual characters, it was unconsciously. Events, though, oh yes, especially where they have involved me.
Is there a certain Author who influenced you in writing?
Probably Mary Gentle, who wrote some great fantasy & science fiction, including an historic which certainly wasn't the history we remember. My mentors too – Dad and my Uncle – introduced me to their favorite – Jack Vance. His Dying Earth series drew me into the setting for Of Machines…, a tale from the last days of Earth.
Which format of book do you prefer, eBook, hardback, or paperback?
It has to be hardback but, maybe paperback for bath-time and eBook when the readers get to be waterproof.
What is your favorite book and Why?  Have you read it more than once?
That’s a difficult one. I've read quite a few more than once but let’s say formative rather than favorite, which might put the Egyptian by Micah Waltari and his other books as very influential, though Waltari is not a well known author. And of course, Mary Gentle who wowed me with Rats and Gargoyles any number of times.
Do you think books transfer to movies well? Why or why not?
I don’t think there’s a definitive answer to that one. Apart from a few scenes, Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit both worked well, I thought. Shakespeare usually does. But there are many that just never do – as a character in a UK TV show used to say scornfully: “Straight to video” in a very Yorkshire accent. (Which I have too.)
What are you currently reading? Are you enjoying it? What format is it? (eBook, hardback or paperback)

The Outcast Blade, sequel to The Fallen Blade by Jon Courtenay Grimwood. Makes my toes curl, makes me weep, “gritty, grimy, decadent, compelling” says the Sunday Times. It’s a hefty paperback.
Is there a book you know you will never read? Or one you tried to read but just couldn't finish?
I've been disappointed by Alastair Reynolds’ Terminal World and I’m not quite sure why. I didn't finish it, either.
What do you think about book trailers?
So, so. My father had one made for one of his books; I don’t think it did anything for the title at all.
What piece of advice would you give to a new writer?
Be prepared for a lot of writing to hit the shredder or the delete box. But enjoy it, all the same. When you do get published, don’t worry about the occasional vicious review or posting. You got there, they didn't.
Do you or would you ever use a pen name?
Have been known to! Adele Abbot didn't just happen to be at the front of the alphabet!
If you could be any character in your book, who would it be and why?
Morion – she’s so damned cool.
      Morion – she’s so damned cool.
If your book was ever made into a movie, what actor/actress would you like to see play the main character(s)?
Gerard:          Damien Lewis
Matthias:       Hugh Laurie
Morion:          Anne Hathaway
Max:               Dwayne Johnson
      Have you ever considered writing in a completely different genre? If so, what would it be and why.
I haven’t thought about that. I’d like Adele Abbot to continue to be associated with fantasy – and somewhat out-of-the-ordinary themes.
Do you think the current popularity of eBooks will last or do you believe it is just another passing trend?
I think it’s more than a passing trend. The eBooks on phones is a phenomenon I wouldn't have guessed at and I think that will see them well into the future.
Considering Traditional Publishing vs. Indie Publishing, do you think one has a clear advantage over the other? If so, please elaborate.
The Traditional Publisher lost the war, in my opinion. They were over-confident and self-opinionated and slow and suffocating. The Indies are great, they are nimble enough to take advantage of new technology, new ideas and new authors.
Would you ever consider writing as a part of a team, rather than on your own?
My Uncle and my Dad manage it very well but it needs two (or more) people who complement & respect each other. If such a one comes along, I’d try it out.
Have you ever had writer’s block? If so, what did you do about it?
I think anyone who works on their own must get writer’s block or it’s equivalent in other disciplines. But I’ve got a 4 year old son who is going to be the greatest fantasy writer ever – he’ll keep me fresh!

Where can readers follow you?
Your web site?                       Adele Abbot
Your Facebook page?        Adele Abbot on Facebook 
Your Twitter details?            Adele Abbot on Twitter


Buy Links for Postponing Armageddon: sign up for a preview & get 35% of the cover price…


Carol 1

Thank you for taking time out from your busy schedule to interview with us today. It has been a real pleasure having you here on our blog. I hope you will visit again in the future.

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